I first started seeing miniatures painted in the Grim Dark fashion last year and via the help of the Internet, I found a tutorial on how to use Enamel washes, something completely new to me and something that got me really excited. I’ve been painting miniatures since 1987 so this was a fresh new technique to learn and I really loved the Grim Dark look.

What is Grim Dark? Well, is short it takes its queue from the artistic style of Early Warhammer 40.000 artwork that has a much more dark, sinister, dirty, grimy look and the the actual label comes from the classic Warhammer 40.000 strap line: “In the grim darkness of the far future there is only war.”

First attempt of Grim Dark without enamel washes

I bought a box of Necrons as I think these would be great for Dungeons & Dragons as Iron Golems.

While waiting for my enamel washed to arrive, I decided to make my first go at Grim Dark using acrylics. I used the little Necro figure as I didn’t mind if it looked different from the 3 bigger ones.

Black Prime, full coat of P3 Pig Iron, stippled highlight with Silver, Vallejo Light Rust Wash, finished up with silver edges and some blue light bits.

I’m really happy with the result.

 

 

 

Time to Try the Enamel Washes from AK Interactive

Using Enamel Washes is quite different. you basically paint the mini all over with the Wash, let it barely dry and then manipulate and dap it off with Qtips dipped in White Spirits to reactivate.

Was quite fun to try this new style and I am happy with the result.

Do I think it is far better than with the Acrylics? Not really, but yet it does have a very grimy style to it, that I find appealing and it left me wonder what this treatment would look on a model with clothes rather than not just metal.

A note on these Necrons: I really like the uniqueness of the three with different weapons and poses.

 

 

 

if you are a Necron player, you will notice I glued the legs on wrong. This was a mistake, but I quite like the running look it gives this one.

 

 

 

The weapons I wanted to look like heated metal. I didn’t want them to look all glowy and futuristic, but at the same time I also wanted them to look magical.

 

 

 

Comparison of Enamel vs Acrylic Washes. I should have used a lighter rust Enamel for better side-by-side.